Plymouth

Eats

Litchfield Hills Blueberry Farm

Pick your own blueberries.

23 Schrowback Road
860.283.9571

Tonn’s Orchard

Pick your own apples, peaches, plums, pumpkins, and flowers.

270 Preston Road
Terryville
860.585.1372

Landmarks

Lock Museum of America

This landmark is a quirky, off-the-beaten-path kind of place that traces the history of locks and lockmaking in America. The Museum houses an extensive lock collection that includes a cannon ball safe, 30 early era time locks, safe escutcheon plates, a large number of British safe locks, door locks, padlocks, handcuffs and keys, and more. Located in Terryville, the museum is directly across from the original site of the Eagle Lock Company, founded in 1854. Major collections are displayed by company or theme. The Eagle Lock Room contains over 1,000 locks and keys manufactured from 1854 to 1954. The Bank Lock Room comprises a selection of bank locks, vault locks, safe locks and time locks. The Corbin-Russwin Room contains a large display of ornate hardware. Several pieces are gold plated and enameled. One of the animated displays shows how a pin tumbler lock works. A large display of mounted door knobs and escutcheons made by Russwin and P & F Corbin during the Victorian era are extensively detailed in styles such as Roman, Greek, French and Italian Renaissance, Gothic, Flemish, and Elizabethan English. The Yale Room accommodates locks manufactured by the company from 1860 to 1950. One of the attractions here is the original patent model of the Mortise Cylinder Pin Tumbler Lock designed by Linus Yale Jr., in 1865. While this device is considered the greatest invention in the history of lockmaking, it is certainly not without historical precedence. Close by is a 4,000 year old Egyptian made pin tumbler lock. There is a large display of locks and hardware made by Sargent and Co. in New Haven, Ct. Several early exit devices and door closers are on display as well. The Antique Lock Room contains a large display of colonial locks and Ornate European locks dating back to the 1500’s. The museum is open seasonally from May 1st through October 31st; Tuesday through Friday, 1:30pm – 4:00pm, weekends by appointment. You can call Thomas Hennessy, Jr. to schedule a visit. See contact info below.

 

230 Main Street (Route 6)
Terryville
860.480.4408
www.lockmuseumofamerica.org

The Plymouth Burying Ground

This is where 38 soldiers from the Revolutionary War are buried. There are gravestones dating back to 1749.

 

Plymouth Land Trust

860.921.6118

info@plymouthlandtrust.org

www.plymouthlandtrust.org

Outdoors

Mattatuck State Forest

Roughly nine hundred acres of Mattatuck State Forest are in Plymouth.
The Forest is open to many kinds of outdoor recreation, including hiking and birdwatching. The Mattatuck Trail runs through the Forest. The Whitestone Cliffs, located off of Rt. 262, are a popular rock climbing area.

www.plymouthct.us/interests

Plymouth Land Trust

The Plymouth Land Trust owns almost 75 acres in Plymouth. The 30-acre Leach Stanton parcel has trail access on North and Main Streets. It  is included in the “Walking Tour of Plymouth Center”. The trail passes by Sunset Rock, with views overlooking Peat Swamp, and the stone foundations of the 1850-era Shelton Tuttle Carriage Factory. The Land Trust also owns the Kleindienst Preserve on Armbruster Road, which has a level 1/2-mile trail ideal for small children. All trails on Land Trust property are marked with white blazes and are open to the public free of charge.

www.plymouthlandtrust.org

Plymouth Town Forest

The Town Forest is a 53-acre woodland that was donated to the Town as open space for the Plymouth Heights subdivision. The Forest is located near the end of Watchtower Road, about 0.3 miles from the intersection with Mt. Tobe Road. The town owns a 50′ wide right-of-way between two houses for access. Look for a weatherbeaten sign at the trail entrance. A 1-mile hiking trail, marked with white blazes, leads from the entrance sign into the forest. The first half of the trail goes downhill, and the last half is uphill, but not excessively so. But you’ll work up a sweat, so be prepared. The Town Forest is not well known, but it is a beautiful place for a hike.

www.plymouthct.us/interests